Portfolio

A selection of Jessica DuLong’s features, interviews, profiles, and essays.

Are Schools Invading Your Privacy?

At 8:15 a.m. on April 16, 2004, sophomore Heather Gore was in art class painting when a familiar voice rang out over the loudspeaker. "The school is on lockdown," announced the principal of Maryland's Kent County High School. Police officers lurked in the hallway with dogs, waiting to search for drugs.

Published April 1, 2005

Women In Machining

As a girl, Francisca Mancia never imagined that someday she'd be stationed at a Mazak 200MSY, making parts in a Long Island machine shop. In Ecuador she'd studied psychology. Now, at 31, she stands peering through wire-rimmed glasses at her misbehaving machine. Her long red hair pulled back in ...

Published February 1, 2006

Welcome to Warsaw

A timeline tracking the development of the orthopedics industry reads like the Book of Genesis: DePuy begat Zimmer. Zimmer begat OEC. OEC and Zimmer begat Biomet. And so on.

Published May 1, 2006

The Death of a Factory

While I wasn't watching, my little brother transformed from a kid into a machinist. Unfortunately I'm realizing it too late. In eight years he went from being an apprentice to running his own jobs start to finish, working raw materials into usable parts according to blueprint specifications.

Published July 1, 2005

Brooklyn Bound: From baseball to BAM, Mermaids to Museums

On a recent Wednesday, just before 1 o'clock, about 30 sightseers gathered at the edge of Manhattan's Battery Park waiting for Gray Line's new trolley-bus to take them to Brooklyn. Among them was Stephanie Dougherty, 14, visiting from Dallas with her family. She'd been here once before when she

Published July 28, 2003

Aria hungry?: Leora Perlman and Meredith Greenberg

At a recent Manhattan party in a deluxe apartment overlooking Central Park, Meredith Greenberg and Leora Perlman - who happens to be the daughter of violin virtuoso Itzhak Perlman - introduce themselves with their standard number. "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen," they sing to a cluster of ...

Published July 23, 2002

Get The Biggest Package

The College Board recently announced that tuition and fees for the 2001-2002 academic year increased an average of five to seven percent. The following tips can help students navigate through government forms, negotiate a better aid package and tap into new scholarship resources.

Published March 1, 2002

BLACKSMITH: When the Hammer Strikes

Meaty forearms and biceps thick as tree limbs attest to Tom Ryan's 20 years as a blacksmith. But if his physique isn't clue enough, the sight of him in leather apron at his anvil leaves no doubt of his trade. The precise swings of his hammer seem effortless. Yet each rapid-fire blow to a ...

Published March 13, 2004

UPS DRIVER: Her Special Deliveries

When it comes to knowing the people in the neighborhood, Lisa Palermo could give Mr. Rogers a run for his money. Since she started winding her signature brown United Parcel Service truck through the tree-lined streets south of Prospect Park in Brooklyn, Palermo has forged surprisingly tight ...

Published November 2, 2003

The Imam of Bedford Stuyvesant

The August heat draws people to the Brooklyn street. Shopkeepers in doorways call to passersby about caps, socks and belts for sale. Young mothers push strollers heavy with plastic shopping bags slung over the handles. Delivery trucks veer around potholes, jockeying for position with ...

Published June 1, 2005

Riding in Cars With Girls

Kate Lake gives us a memoir any lesbian can understand - one car at a time This is not your grand-father's memoir. Kate Lake's snappy little book - a collection of paintings, each accompanied by a short vignette - tells her life story as a series of snapshots, each episode embodied in a

Published June 10, 2002

Down Home in Georgia

For the third year in a row, Last Chance Pawn Shop's owner has offered up his backfield to Hammerfest, one of the biggest White Power music festivals in the nation.

Published November 12, 2001